Don't Cry Daddy

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Words & Music: Mac Davis
Today I stumbled from my bed
With thunder crashing in my head
My pillow still wet
From last night tears
And as I think of giving up
A voice inside my coffee-cup
Kept crying but
And ringing in my ears

Don't cry daddy
Daddy, please don't cry
Daddy, you've still got me and little Tommy
Together we'll find a brand new mommy
Daddy, daddy, please laugh again
Daddy ride us on your back again
Oh, daddy, please don't cry

Why are children always first
To feel the pain and hurt the worst
It's true, but somehow
It just don't seem right
'Cause ev'ry time I cry I know
It hurts my little children so
I wonder will it be the same tonight

Don't cry daddy
Daddy, please don't cry
Daddy, you've still got me and little Tommy
Together we'll find a brand new mommy
Daddy, daddy, please laugh again
Daddy ride us on your back again
Oh, daddy, please don't cry
Oh, daddy, please don't cry
Recorded: 1969/01/15, first released on single

Reactions

McHobbit (profilecontact) wrote on Feb 12, 2014report abuse
Whenever I hear this song, I think a video clip of him joking around with this song and In The Ghetto at soundcheck or something. I'm kind of on the fence about it apart from that, I guess. I never liked the "find a brand new mommy" line either. I sometimes wondered if it was supposed to be a dig at Vernon
sugartummy (profilecontact) wrote on Mar 2, 2013report abuse
Can't keep my eyes dry with this one. Beautiful. Easy to strum on the guitar as well.
ElvisSacramento (profilecontact) wrote on Jan 21, 2013report abuse
This is such a spectacular, emotional and unique song and it rightfully was a top 10 hit for Elvis here in the United States back in 1969. With that said, this song should definitely be much better known than it actually is. The other six songs that Elvis recorded that were written or co-written by Mac Davis are "In The Ghetto", "Memories", "A Little Less Conversation", "Clean Up Your Own Back Yard", "Charro!" and "Nothingville".
Monster (profilecontact) wrote on Jun 8, 2011report abuse
Lyrically Mac Davis does a fine job painting the picture of a man trying to carry on without his presumably dead wife. He drinks himself into a tearful sleep and wakes up with a banging hangover to face yet another day without her. His young kids are able to find a positive perspective on the awful situation and they remain hopeful for the future and are the only thing keeping him going. Yes it's a downer but the melody is lovely and the song is beautifully performed. The live version from 1970 is especially enjoyable.
GEORGE (GK) (profilecontact) wrote on Jun 8, 2011report abuse
As pointed out, songs like this, (story songs) were big at that time. And this one sold, and charted well. Personally, I like this song alot, and Elvis and the crew, do a great performance. The Memphis sessions, proved Elvis was back !And, I wish RCA had continued releasing more singles from the amazing Memphis sessions. I think songs like "Only the strong survive" & "Power of my Love" and so many more from these sessions, could have been huge on the "Top 100 Singles Charts".
Steve V (profilecontact) wrote on Dec 17, 2009report abuse
It's OK but there was a lot of better material to choose from those sessions as A side single material including the flip Rubberneckin. I had to be in the mood for it back then and today I find it a bit corny.
Jim Hoff (profilecontact) wrote on Dec 16, 2009report abuse
A very big hit in Denamrk, when it came out. It still has the record on the top 20 list for 32 weeks together with The Archies song (% Billion people).
OtisBlue22 (profilecontact) wrote on Dec 16, 2009report abuse
This is the kind of song he turned to in '72. It's thematically consistent with 'You Gave Me a Mountain' and 'Always on My Mind'. However, the 1972 recordings are more painfully wrought and offer a more accurate reflection of Presley's personal state. I prefer 'Kentucky Rain' myself.
old shep (profilecontact) wrote on Dec 16, 2009report abuse
Well recorded with Elvis in good voice but the song is a bit of a dirge. The sort of song you might choose to play on the build up to a suicide bid.
Swen (profilecontact) wrote on Dec 16, 2009report abuse
When it came out it was certain hit material, though definitely not a personal favourite. Once again proven that Elvis would inevitably be successful with good material from good song writers. Trouble was however that these song writers started recording the songs themselves, one of them being Mac Davis, and the "famous 25% robbery" by "the Elvis camp". I´ve never understood why so many fans seem to like the B side "Rubberneckin´", but that´s taste for you.
dgirl (profilecontact) wrote on Dec 16, 2009report abuse
Nice song, well sung, but the lyrics kind of bugged me also. Find a brand new Mommy makes me cringe, however this type of stuff always sold well (Honey, Daddy Dont You Walk So Fast, etc). I much prefer the flip Rubberneckin and thought it could have charted even higher if the 'A' side.
Deano1 (profilecontact) wrote on Dec 16, 2009report abuse
I have to say this one is no where near being one of my favorites. Elvis sings this saccharine, morose ballad well, but the lyrics to the song are just down right silly ("Daddy, you've still got me and little Tommy, Together we'll find a brand new mommy" and "And as I think of giving up, A voice inside my coffee-cup") and it makes it very hard to take it seriously. It seems like Mac Davis was just trying to rhyme words and the song contradicts itself. The children are trying to cheer him up and ready to find a new Mommy (she is just replaceable, I assume!!!, I can't imagine Elvis feeling that way), but then the song says "children hurt the worst"? "In the Ghetto", "Mama Liked The Roses" and "Long Black Limousine" from the same recording sessions and they are infinitely better "sad" songs than this one. I prefer the flipside "Rubberneckin" to this one and I put this song in the bottom 10 of non-movie songs he recorded.
TBG (profilecontact) wrote on Dec 16, 2009report abuse
One of the best songs Elvis ever recorded from one of the greatest song writers, he also wrote In The Ghetto (which originally was pitched to Sammy Davis Jr!!), Memories and A Little Conversation. Mac Davis is quoted on this song: "Don't Cry Daddy" is a pretty sad song. He got to the end of it and it was just real quiet when Elvis says, I'm gonna cut that someday for my daddy. And, by God he did. He lived up to his word." Elvis' voice is magical on this song, it can still be played today without sounding dated - it's truly a great song by a great performer.
MJB63 (profilecontact) wrote on Apr 8, 2009report abuse
Good song by Mac Davis,fine singing by our man...i can see why it was a hit.

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